vegan • plant-based • dairy-free • gluten-free • sugar-free

We’re big fans of ginger. Ginger goes in pretty much everything around here – from smoothies to salad dressings, curries to kombucha. It’s anti-inflammatory, rich in antioxidants, good for digestion, and most importantly of all, it’s packed full of flavour. When you’re trying to fit a lot of fresh vegetables into your diet, giving them an extra zing of something like ginger or citrus makes them a lot more palatable.

But sometimes you just want cookies.

These are especially handy when you’ve got people coming round who find your vegan GF diet a bit weird. On the one hand you don’t want to buy chocolate biscuits to keep your guests happy, only to have ‘illegal’ substances rattling around your cupboard until next time. On the other hand you do want to have something yummy to offer, which everyone can enjoy.

Ginger was popular with Romans and Ancient Greeks, who used to put a piece inside bread to aid digestion. This gradually developed into today’s gingerbread. Early European gingerbread was made with ground almonds and stale bread, pressed into wooden moulds and decorated with icing. Queen Elizabeth I is said to have offered the first gingerbread men to her visitors, made in their own likenesses.

Vegan Gluten-Free Gingerbread Biscuits

Vegan Gluten-Free Gingerbread Biscuits

As the dough is so pliable, you can go to town with shapes here. There are countless cutters available these days, so you could choose the standard gingerbread man / woman, or branch out into dinosaurs and ninjas. It’s harder to get an even bake on shapes with small details around the edges, so you’d probably want to aim for a soft bake of you’re feeling adventurous, and keep a close eye on them.

Otherwise, if you think biscuits ought to be round, you can still get creative with a stamp set.

Vegan Gluten-Free Gingerbread Biscuits

Gluten-Free Gingerbread Biscuits

Yields36 ServingsPrep Time1 hr 30 minsCook Time20 minsTotal Time1 hr 50 mins

 260 g rice flour
 185 g almond flour (or ground almonds)
 70 g flax seeds, ground
 1 tsp baking soda
 150 g dried dates, chopped
 100 g sultanas or raisins
 2 tbsp coconut oil
 3 tbsp fresh ginger, grated
 3 tbsp ground ginger
 2 tsp ground cinnamon
 1 tsp ground cloves
 2 tsp vanilla essence
 ½ tsp salt

1

Have these handy:

  • A food processor, high speed blender or stick blender
  • A large mixing bowl
  • A small saucepan
  • A large baking tray
  • A rolling pin
  • Cookie cutters / stamps (or a drinking glass)
  • Non-stick baking paper
2

Combine the rice flour, almond flour, flax and baking soda in a large mixing bowl.

3

In a small saucepan, bring 250ml of water to the boil, then add the remaining ingredients. Let the mixture bubble rapidly for 7-8 minutes, stirring regularly. Take it off the heat when the water has just been absorbed – it'll look like mincemeat.

4

Let the mixture cool, then mash it into a smooth sauce with the food processor or blender.

5

Add this to the bowl of dry ingredients and combine, until it forms a sticky dough. Chill in the fridge for 1 hour.

6

Preheat the oven to 175°C (350°F).

7

Line the baking tray with baking paper and spread out the mixture. Put another sheet of baking paper on top and roll it out, until it's about 5mm thick – it doesn't matter if it reaches the edges or not. If you have some excess, set it aside for the next batch below.

8

If you're using a detailed stamp or cutter for your shapes, you'll get a cleaner edge by putting the tray in the freezer for 10 minutes.

9

Remove the top paper, and make the shapes of your choice with the cookie cutters / stamps / up-ended drinking glass. Carefully remove the excess bits in between and set them aside.

10

Put the tray of biscuits in the oven for 20 minutes, turning it around after 10 minutes to help them bake evenly. Oven times vary, so keep an eye on them.

11

Meanwhile, fold the top sheet of baking paper in half, so you can roll out the remaining dough again between the 2 sides. Peel off the top half and cut out some more shapes. You might need to improvise a shape with the last bits of excess.

12

Once the first batch is done, slide them onto a cooling rack (or leave them to cool on the tray for a bit more crunch), then bake the second batch as above.

Ingredients

 260 g rice flour
 185 g almond flour (or ground almonds)
 70 g flax seeds, ground
 1 tsp baking soda
 150 g dried dates, chopped
 100 g sultanas or raisins
 2 tbsp coconut oil
 3 tbsp fresh ginger, grated
 3 tbsp ground ginger
 2 tsp ground cinnamon
 1 tsp ground cloves
 2 tsp vanilla essence
 ½ tsp salt

Directions

1

Have these handy:

  • A food processor, high speed blender or stick blender
  • A large mixing bowl
  • A small saucepan
  • A large baking tray
  • A rolling pin
  • Cookie cutters / stamps (or a drinking glass)
  • Non-stick baking paper
2

Combine the rice flour, almond flour, flax and baking soda in a large mixing bowl.

3

In a small saucepan, bring 250ml of water to the boil, then add the remaining ingredients. Let the mixture bubble rapidly for 7-8 minutes, stirring regularly. Take it off the heat when the water has just been absorbed – it'll look like mincemeat.

4

Let the mixture cool, then mash it into a smooth sauce with the food processor or blender.

5

Add this to the bowl of dry ingredients and combine, until it forms a sticky dough. Chill in the fridge for 1 hour.

6

Preheat the oven to 175°C (350°F).

7

Line the baking tray with baking paper and spread out the mixture. Put another sheet of baking paper on top and roll it out, until it's about 5mm thick – it doesn't matter if it reaches the edges or not. If you have some excess, set it aside for the next batch below.

8

If you're using a detailed stamp or cutter for your shapes, you'll get a cleaner edge by putting the tray in the freezer for 10 minutes.

9

Remove the top paper, and make the shapes of your choice with the cookie cutters / stamps / up-ended drinking glass. Carefully remove the excess bits in between and set them aside.

10

Put the tray of biscuits in the oven for 20 minutes, turning it around after 10 minutes to help them bake evenly. Oven times vary, so keep an eye on them.

11

Meanwhile, fold the top sheet of baking paper in half, so you can roll out the remaining dough again between the 2 sides. Peel off the top half and cut out some more shapes. You might need to improvise a shape with the last bits of excess.

12

Once the first batch is done, slide them onto a cooling rack (or leave them to cool on the tray for a bit more crunch), then bake the second batch as above.

Gluten-Free Gingerbread Biscuits
Vegan Gluten-Free Gingerbread Biscuits





Have you tried this recipe? How did it go? Got any tips or questions about gingerbread biscuits? Leave us a comment below, we’d love to hear from you.

Share

This site uses cookies. More info »

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close